Can the Japanese-Internment be applied to the post-9/11 discrimination?

What More

I used to be able to walk around without the stares

Then after the bombs fell out of the sky                           Then after the planes fell out of the sky

And more than 2000 people died                                            And more than 3000 people died

Trapped by a fire that I did not create

 

I lower my head in shame                                                       I raise my head without shame

 

Because I did not do this.

I attract stares at the grocery store                                                      I attract stares at the airport

They tell me to stand in a different line and

Ask me questions about the government.                 Ask me questions about another government.

They say it is because of my eyes                                         They say it is because of my clothes

That I am treated like this

I speak English, I am almost a citizen                                   I speak English, I am a U.S. citizen

What more can I do?

 

I cannot change the color of my skin.

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2 responses

  1. The structure of this poem really provides an intertwined relationship between the modern day and memories of the interment camps. It shows how America is still struggling to come to terms with its fear of outsiders.

    March 31, 2012 at 11:55 pm

  2. Pingback: Blog Presentation « Japanese-American Internment Memories

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